Friday, May 23, 2008

Vanilla Cupcake


Vanilla Cupcake

225gm Softened unsalted butter
225gm Caster sugar
225gm Self-raising flour
1tsp Baking powder
4nos Eggs
1pod Vanilla(scrap out the seed,use the seed)


Here is the recipe the cupcakes!

Preheat the over to 175C.
Place 15 paper cups in the muffin tray.
Place all the ingredients in a medium bowl and beat with an electronic whisk till smooth and pale, about 2 to 3 minutes.
Spoon the mixture into the paper cups.
Bake for 20 minutes.
Remove the tins from the oven and cool for 5 minutes.
Then remove the cupcakes and cool on a rack.
Store in an airtight for up to 3 days.
Proceed to decoration on your liking.


It is a simple cupcakes to make and taste lovely too, do try when you are free in your kitchen.

. . . Love Sunny Yaw

Sunday, April 6, 2008

Mini Fraise Moussecake

It is a very simple strawberry moussecake as you just need to have sponge cake, strawberry syrup & puree, fresh mousse, strawberry jelly and fresh strawberries.


Cake Base
Cake sponge about 10mm thick.

Strawberry Mousse
Whipping cream 280gm
Strawberry puree 100gm
Strawberry syrup(Monin) 15ml
Egg white 50gm
Granulated sugar 35gm
Gelatin leaf 3envelopes

Puree Jelly Topping
Strawberry Puree 100gm
Gelatin Leaf 1.5envelopes

Whole Strawberries
Sliced Strawberries


Make the strawberry mousse
Whisk egg white until foamy. Then, add in granulated sugar gradually and whisk until soft peak form.
Whisk whipping cream and gradually add in Monin strawberry syrup until soft peak form.
Pour strawberry puree into the whipping cream and fold well with a rubber spatula.
Fold meringue into strawberry mixture and gently fold well.
Pour in metled gelatin into the strawberry mixture and gently fold.
Lay the cake based onto the minicake mould.
If want a moist cake, just brush some Monin strawberry syrup onto the surface of the cake.
Place the sliced strawberries onto the side of the minicake mould.
Pour the strawberry mousse into the minicake mould and refrigerate for 1 1/2 hours.

Melt gelatin into the hot strawberry puree. Cool it down until 50C to puree jelly. Pour it over the top.
Evenly place the whole strawberries on the top and refrigerate for half an hour.
Unmould the mini strawberry moussecake by warming the minicake mould.

This mini fraise moussecake looks beautiful, divine and not difficult to make and assemble, definite will charm your guests!

Love Sunny Yaw

Monday, March 17, 2008

Very Berry

For Almond Cake

150g Grated Almond Powder
150g Powdered Sugar
110g Egg
80g Egg Yolk
260g Egg White
140g Sugar
50g Bread Flour
60g Cake Flour

Whisk almond powder and powdered sugar in a bowl by a paddle whisker. Add egg ang egg yolk gradually until incorporated.
In a clean bowl, whip egg and sugar until soft peaks form.
Combine egg mixture and egg white mixure. Add sifted bread flour and cake flour until well blended.
Bake about 10-15 minutes, upper 200C lower 180C.

For Strawberry Mousse

310g Strawberry Puree
150g Sugar
21cc Red Wine (optional)
24g Gelatin
480g Whipping Heavy Cream
100g Sliced Strawberry

Cook puree, sugar and wine until brings to a boil.
Add softened gelatin.
Add whipping heavy cream and stir until well blended.
Stir in sliced strawberry.

Fruit Syrup(optional)**

300g Strawberries
150g Sugar
100cc Water

Cook strawberries, sugar and water until brings to boil. Wait until cool an brush on the almond cake.

**for simplicity, use Monin's Strawberry Syrup

For Topping

250g Heavy Whipping Cream

To Assemble

Place almond cake piece in the pan.
Pile on strawberry mousse.
Place almond cake on top of the mousse.
Pile on again with strawberry mousse.
Top the mousse with another layer of almond cake.
Finish the top with whipping cream.

Try it out, it is delicious and very berry too! . . . . Love Sunny Yaw

Friday, February 29, 2008

Feb Daring Baker Challenge - French Bread

Making French Bread:
Step 1: The Dough Mixture – le fraisage (or frasage)

1 cake (0.6 ounce) (20grams) fresh yeast or 1 package dry active yeast
1/3 cup (75ml) warm water, not over 100 degrees F/38C in a glass measure
3 1/2 cup (about 1 lb) (490 gr) all purpose flour, measured by scooping
dry measure cups into flour and sweeping off excess
2 1/4 tsp (12 gr) salt
1 1/4 cups (280 - 300ml) tepid water @ 70 – 74 degrees/21 - 23C

Both Methods: Stir the yeast in the 1/3 cup warm water and let liquefy completely while measuring flour into mixing bowl. When yeast has liquefied, pour it into the flour along with the salt and the rest of the water.

Hand Method: Stir and cut the liquids into the flour with a rubber spatula, pressing firmly to form a dough and making sure that all the bits of flour and unmassed pieces are gathered in. Turn dough out onto kneading surface, scraping bowl clean. Dough will be soft and sticky.

Turn dough out onto kneading surface, scraping bowl clean. Dough will be soft and sticky. Let the dough rest for 2 – 3 minutes while you wash and dry the bowl (and the dough hook if using a stand mixer).

Step 2: Kneading – petrissage
The flour will have absorbed the liquid during this short rest, and the dough will have a little more cohesion for the kneading that is about to begin. Use one hand only for kneading and keep the other clean to hold a pastry scrapper, to dip out extra flour, to answer the telephone, and so forth. Your object in kneading is to render the dough perfectly smooth and to work it sufficiently so that all the gluten molecules are moistened and joined together into an interlocking web. You cannot see this happen, of course, but you can feel it because the dough will become elastic and will retract into shape when you push it out.

Hand Method: Start kneading by lifting the near edge of the dough, using a pastry scraper or stiff wide spatula to help you if necessary, and flipping the dough over onto itself. Scrape dough off the surface and slap it down; lift edge and flip it over again, repeating the movement rapidly.

In 2 -3 minutes the dough should have enough body so that you can give it a quick forward push with the heel of your hand as you flip it over. Continue to knead rapidly and vigorously in this way. If the dough remains too sticky, knead in a sprinkling of flour. The whole kneading process will take 5 – 10 minutes, depending on how expert you become.

Shortly after this point, the dough should have developed enough elasticity so it draws back into shape when pushed, indicating the gluten molecules have united and are under tension like a thin web of rubber; the dough should also begin to clean itself off the kneading surface, although it will stick to your fingers if you hold a pinch of dough for more than a second or two.

Let dough rest for 3 – 4 minutes. Knead by hand for a minute. The surface should now look smooth; the dough will be less sticky but will still remain soft. It is now ready for its first rise.

Step 3: First Rising – pointage premier temps (3-5 hours at around 70 degrees)
You now have approximately 3 cups of dough that is to rise to 3 1/2 times its original volume, or to about 10 1/2 cups. Wash and fill the mixing bowl with 10 1/2 cups of tepid water (70 – 80 degrees) and make a mark to indicate that level on the outside of the bowl. Note, that the bowl should have fairly upright sides; if they are too outward slanting, the dough will have difficulty in rising. Pour out the water, dry the bowl, and place the dough in it

Slip the bowl into a large plastic bag or cover with plastic, and top with a folded bath towel. Set on a wooden surface, marble or stone are too cold. Or on a folded towel or pillow, and let rise free from drafts anyplace where the temperature is around 70 degrees. If the room is too hot, set bowl in water and keep renewing water to maintain around 70 degrees. Dough should take at least 3 – 4 hours to rise to 10 1/2 cups. If temperature is lower than 70 degrees, it will simply take longer.

When fully risen, the dough will be humped into a slight dome, showing that the yeast is still active; it will be light and spongy when pressed. There will usually be some big bubbly blisters on the surface, and if you are using a glass bowl you will see bubbles through the glass.

Step 4: Deflating and Second Rising – rupture; pointage deuxieme temps (1 1/2 to 2 hours at around 70 degrees)
The dough is now ready to be deflated, which will release the yeast engendered gases and redistribute the yeast cells so that the dough will rise again and continue the fermentation process.

With a rubber spatula, dislodge dough from inside of bowl and turn out onto a lightly floured surface, scraping bowl clean. If dough seems damp and sweaty, sprinkle with a tablespoon of flour.

Lightly flour the palms of your hands and flatten the dough firmly but not too roughly into a circle, deflating any gas bubbles by pinching them.

Lift a corner of the near side and flip it down on the far side. Do the same with the left side, then the right side. Finally, lift the near side and tuck it just under the edge of the far side. The mass of dough will look like a rounded cushion.

Slip the sides of your hands under the dough and return it to the bowl. Cover and let rise again, this time to not quite triple, but again until it is dome shaped and light and spongy when touched.

Step 5: Cutting and resting dough before forming loaves
Loosen dough all around inside of bowl and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Because of its two long rises, the dough will have much more body. If it seems damp and sweaty, sprinkle lightly with flour.

Making clean, sure cuts with a large knife or a bench scraper, divide the dough into:
3 equal pieces for long loaves (baguettes or batards) or small round loaves (boules only)
5 – 6 equal pieces for long thin loaves (ficelles)
10 – 12 equal pieces for small oval rolls (petits pains, tire-bouchons) or small round rolls (petits pains, champignons)
2 equal pieces for medium round loaves (pain de menage or miche only)
If you making one large round loaf (pain de menage, miche, or pain boulot), you will not cut the dough at all and just need to follow the directions below.
After you have cut each piece, lift one end and flip it over onto the opposite end to fold the dough into two; place dough at far side of kneading surface. Cover loosely with a sheet of plastic and let rest for 5 minutes before forming. This relaxes the gluten enough for shaping but not long enough for dough to begin rising again.

While the dough is resting, prepare the rising surface; smooth the canvas or linen towelling on a large tray or baking sheet, and rub flour thoroughly into the entire surface of the cloth to prevent the dough from sticking

Step 6: Forming the loaves – la tourne; la mise en forme des patons

Because French bread stands free in the oven and is not baked in a pan, it has to be formed in such a way that the tension of the coagulated gluten cloak on the surface will hold the dough in shape.

For Long Loaves - The Batard: (Baguettes are typically much too long for home ovens but the shaping method is the same)

After the 3 pieces of dough have rested 5 minutes, form one piece at a time, keeping the remaining ones covered.

Working rapidly, turn the dough upside down on a lightly floured kneading surface and pat it firmly but not too roughly into an 8 to 10 inch oval with the lightly floured palms of your hands. Deflate any gas bubbles in the dough by pinching them.

Fold the dough in half lengthwise by bringing the far edge down over the near edge.

Being sure that the working surface is always lightly floured so the dough will not stick and tear, which would break the lightly coagulated gluten cloak that is being formed, seal the edges of the dough together, your hands extended, thumbs out at right angles and touching.

Roll the dough a quarter turn forward so the seal is on top.

Flatten the dough again into an oval with the palms of your hands.

Press a trench along the central length of the oval with the side of one hand.

Fold in half again lengthwise.

This time seal the edges together with the heel of one hand, and roll the dough a quarter of a turn toward you so the seal is on the bottom.

Now, by rolling the dough back and forth with the palms of your hands, you will lengthen it into a sausage shape. Start in the middle, placing your right palm on the dough, and your left palm on top of your right hand.

Roll the dough forward and backward rapidly, gradually sliding your hands towards the two ends as the dough lengthens.

Deflate any gas blisters on the surface by pinching them. Repeat the rolling movement rapidly several times until the dough is 16 inches long, or whatever length will fit on your baking sheet. During the extension rolls, keep circumference of dough as even as possible and try to start each roll with the sealed side of the dough down, twisting the rope of dough to straighten the line of seal as necessary. If seal disappears, as it sometimes does with all purpose flour, do not worry.

Place the shaped piece of dough, sealed side up, at one end of the flour rubbed canvas, leaving a free end of canvas 3 to 4 inches wide. The top will crust slightly as the dough rises; it is turned over for baking so the soft, smooth underside will be uppermost.

Pinch a ridge 2 1/2 to 3 inches high in the canvas to make a trough, and a place for the next piece. Cover dough with plastic while you are forming the rest of the loaves.

After all the pieces of dough are in place, brace the two sides of the canvas with long rolling pins, baking sheets or books, if the dough seems very soft and wants to spread out. Cover the dough loosely with flour rubbed dish towel or canvas, and a sheet of plastic. Proceed immediately to the final rising, next step.

For Small Round Rolls – Petits Pains, Champignons: The principles are the same here as for the preceding round loaves, but make the cushion shape with your fingers rather than the palms of your hands.

For the second stage, during which the ball of dough is rotated smooth side up, roll it under the palm of one hand, using your thumb and little finger to push the edges of the dough underneath and to form the pucker, where the edges join together.

Place the formed ball of dough pucker side up on the flour rubbed canvas and cover loosely while forming the rest. Space the balls 2 inches apart. When risen to almost triple its size, lift gently with lightly floured fingers and place pucker side down on baking sheet. Rolls are usually too small for a cross so make either one central slash or the semi-circular cut.

Step 7: Final Rise – l’appret - 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours at around 70 degrees

The covered dough is now to rise until almost triple in volume; look carefully at its pre-risen size so that you will be able to judge correctly. It will be light and swollen when risen, but will still feel a little springy when pressed.

It is important that the final rise take place where it is dry; if your kitchen is damp, hot, and steamy, let the bread rise in another room or dough will stick to the canvas and you will have difficulty getting it off and onto another baking sheet. It will turn into bread in the oven whatever happens, but you will have an easier time and a better loaf if you aim for ideal conditions.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees about 30 minutes before estimated baking time.

Step 8: Unmolding risen dough onto baking sheet – le demoulage.

The 3 pieces of risen dough are now to be unmolded from the canvas and arranged upside down on the baking sheet. The reason for this reversal is that the present top of the dough has crusted over during its rise; the smooth, soft underside should be uppermost in the oven so that the dough can expand and allow the loaf its final puff of volume. For the unmolding you will need a non-sticking intermediate surface such as a stiff piece of cardboard or plywood sprinkled with cornmeal or pulverized pasta.

Remove rolling pins or braces. Place the long side of the board at one side of the dough; pull the edge of the canvas to flatten it; then raise and flip the dough softly upside down onto the board.

Dough is now lying along one edge of the unmolding board: rest this edge on the right side of a lightly buttered baking sheet. Gently dislodge dough onto baking sheet, keeping same side of the dough uppermost: this is the soft smooth side, which was underneath while dough rose on canvas. If necessary run sides of hands lightly down the length of the dough to straighten it. Unmold the next piece of dough the same way, placing it to the left of the first, leaving a 3 inch space. Unmold the final piece near the left side of the sheet.

Step 9: Slashing top of the dough – la coupe.

The top of each piece of dough is now to be slashed in several places. This opens the covering cloak of gluten and allows a bulge of dough underneath to swell up through the cuts during the first 10 minutes of baking, making decorative patterns in the crust. These are done with a blade that cuts almost horizontally into the dough to a depth of less than half an inch. Start the cut at the middle of the blade, drawing toward you in a swift clean sweep. This is not quite as easy as it sounds, and you will probably make ragged cuts at first; never mind, you will improve with practice. Use an ordinary razor blade and slide one side of it into a cork for safety; or buy a barbers straight razor at a cutlery store.

For a 16 to 18 inch loaf make 3 slashes. Note that those at the two ends go straight down the loaf but are slightly off centre, while the middle slash is at a slight angle between the two. Make the first cut at the far end, then the middle cut, and finally the third. Remember that the blade should lie almost parallel to the surface of the dough.

Step 10: Baking – about 25 minutes; oven preheated to 450 degrees (230 degrees C).

As soon as the dough has been slashed, moisten the surface either by painting with a soft brush dipped in cold water, or with a fine spray atomizer, and slide the baking sheet onto rack in upper third of preheated oven. Rapidly paint or spray dough with cold water after 3 minutes, again in 3 minutes, and a final time 3 minutes later. Moistening the dough at this point helps the crust to brown and allows the yeast action to continue in the dough a little longer. The bread should be done in about 25 minutes; the crust will be crisp, and the bread will make a hollow sound when thumped.

If you want the crust to shine, paint lightly with a brush dipped in cold water as soon as you slide the baking sheet out of oven.

Step 11: Cooling – 2 to 3 hours.
Cool the bread on a rack or set it upright in a basket or large bowl so that air can circulate freely around each piece. Although bread is always exciting to eat fresh from the oven, it will have a much better taste when the inside is thoroughly cool and has composed itself.

Step 12: Storing French bread
Because it contains no fats or preservatives of any kind, French bread is at its best when eaten the day it is baked. It will keep for a day or two longer, wrapped airtight and refrigerated, but it will keep best if you freeze it – let the loaves cool first, then wrap airtight. To thaw, unwrap and place on a baking sheet in a cold oven; heat the oven to 400 degrees. In about 20 minutes the crust will be hot and crisp, and the bread thawed. The French, of course, never heat French bread except possibly on Monday, the baker’s holiday, when the bread is a day old.

Step 13: Canvas housekeeping
After each bread session, if you have used canvas, brush it thoroughly to remove all traces of flour and hang it out to dry before putting away. Otherwise the canvas could become mouldy and ruin your next batch of dough.

After trying out this recipe, baking french bread can be very exciting as I had learning something new but by the end of the day I am totally exhausted! . . . . Love Sunny Yaw

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Chocolat Macarons

I had baked some Chocolat Macaroons, recipe adapted from Pierre Herme's Chocolate Desserts:

140gm finely ground almond powder
250gm confectioners' sugar
25gm dutch processed cocoa powder
100gm egg whites


1. Line two large insulated baking sheets with parchment paper, or line two regular baking sheets and put each one on tops of another baking sheet. Fit a large pastry bag with a plain 1cm or 1.5cm tip. Set these aside for the moment.

2. If you've got almond powder, just sift it with theconfectioners' sugar and cocoa. If you're starting with almond, place the almonds, sugar and cocoa in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade and process until the mixture is as fine as flour, at least 3 minutes. Stop after every minute to check your progress and to scrape down the sides of the bowl.This si not a quick on-and-off operation. Although the almonds may look as thought they're pulverized after a minute or so, they won't be: The nuts really need 3 to 5 minutes to ground to powder or flour. When the almonds are ground, using a wooden sppon, press the mixture through a medium strainer.

3. For this recipe to succeed, you need 100gm of egg whites, which means using 3 large egg whites plus part of a fourth white. The easiest way to get a portion of a white is to put the white into a cup, beat it lightly with a fork and then measure out what you need. Once the eggs are measured, they need to be brought to room temperature so they can be beaten to their fullest volume. You can leave the whites on the counter until they reach room temperature, or you can put them into a microwave-safe bowl and place them in a microwave oven set on lowest power; heat he whites for about 10seconds. Stir the whites and containue to heat them - still on lowest power - in 5 second spurs until they are about 23C. If they're a little warmer, that's okay. To keep the eggs warm, run the mixer bowl under hot water. Dry the bowl well, pour the whites into the bowl and fit the mixer with whisk attachment.

4. Beat the egg whites at low to medium speed until they are white and foamy. Turn the speed and supple - when you lift the whisk, the whites should form a peak that droops just a little. Leave the whites in the mixer should form a peak that droops just a little. Leave the whites in the mixer bowl ot transfer them to a large bowl and working with a rubber spatula, fold the dry ingredients gently into the whiotes in three or four additions. It will seem like a lot of dry ingredients to go into a relatively small amount of whites, but keep folding and you'll get everything in. Don't worry if the whites deflate and the batter looks a little funny - that's just what 's supposed to happen. When all the dry ingredients are incorporated, the mixture will look like a cake batter, if you lift a little with your finger, it should from a gentle, quickly falling peak.

5. Spoon the batter into the pastry bag and pipe it out onto the prepared baking sheets ( to keep each sheet of paper steady, "glue" it down by iping a bit of batter at each corner of the baking sheet): Pipe the batterinto rounds about 2.5cm in diameter, leavingabout 2.5cm betweeneach round. When you've piped out all the macaroons, lift each baking sheet with both hands and then bang it down on the counter. Don't be afraid - you need to get the air out of the batter. Set the baking sheets aside at room temperature for 15minutes while you preheat the oven.

6. Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 220C.

7. You should bake these one pan at a time, so dust the tops of the macaroons one pan with cocoa powder and slide one of the sheets into the oven. As soon as the baking sheet is in the oven, turn the temperature sown to 180C and insert the handle of a wooden spoon into the oven to keep the door slightly ajar. Bake the macaroons for 10 to 12 minutes or until they are smoooth and just firm to the touch. Transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack and turn the oven heat back up to 220C.
To remove the macaroons from the parchment - they should be removed as soon as they come from the oven - you will need to create moisture unde the cookies. Carefully loosen the parchment at four corners and lifting the paper at one corner, pour a little hot water under the paper onto the baking sheet. The water may bubble and steam, so make sure your face and hands are out of the way. Move the parchment around ot tilt the baking sheet so that the parchmentis evenly dampened. Allow the macaroons to remainon the parchment, soaking up the moisture, for about 15seconds, then peel the macaroons of the paper and place them on a cooling rack.

8 When the oven is at the right temperature, repeat with the second sheet of macaoons. Remove from the patchment as directed above and let cool.

For the ganache:
For each sandwhich, pipe a dollop of a ganache about 1.5 cm across on the flat side of one cookie and top with another cookie, flatside down, using it to spread the ganache so that it runs to the edge. Transfer the filled macaroons to covered container and place them in the refrigerator to soften overnight before serving.

Big Boys Oven

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Baileys Cheesecake

Baileys Cheesecake, a recipe adapted from Anita & Sanny, Jam Bakery.


a 6 x 6inch square cake mould

an Oreo biscuit cake base
- Add crushed biscuits into melted unsalted butter
- Mix well with a teaspoon
- Pour all the mixture into the cake ring
- Press until it's spread out evenly with a teaspoon

Defrost cream cheese in room tempreature


Cake Base
80g Crushed Oreo Biscuit
40g Melted Unsalted Butter

Baileys Cheese
190g Cream Cheese
50g Baileys Irish Cream
70g Granulated Sugar
170g Whipping Cream
120g Milk
10g Crunchy Chocolate Perls
4envelops Gelatin Leaf

To decorate
1pcs Chocolate Stick
5g Chocolate Cocoa Powder
1pcs Edible Gold Paper


1. Whisk whipping cream with electric mixer at medium speed unitl soft peak form. Leave for use later
2. Whisk cream cheese at medium speed until smooth. Then add in granulated sugar gradually and whisk until blended.
3. Pour milk in and fold well with rubber spatula.
4. Pour in Baileys Irish Cream and gently fold well.
5. Fold in whisked whipping cream and gently mix well.
6. Prepare melted gelatin. pour into the mixture, fold gently and quickly until smooth.
7. Pour half of the mixture into the cake mould, and then evenlt scatter the crunchy chocolate pearls on top.
8. Pour the rest of the mixture into the cake mould and refrigerate for 1.5hours. Lastly, sift some chocolate cocoa powder on the top and decorate the cake with the chocolate stick and edible gold paper.

Big Boys Oven

Saturday, February 2, 2008

Mango Moussecake

Mango Moussecake is something that I would like to introduce to you. It may not be new and maybe common but I really adore them as it is creamy, fragrant and juicy! In Malaysia we have various type of mangoes and plentyful too. So I had this baked over the weekday.


Cake Base and Cake Top
Cake sponge about 12mm thick.

Mango Mousse
Whipping cream 280gm
Mango puree 100gm
Mango syrup(Monin) 15ml
Egg white 50gm
Granulated sugar 35gm
Gelatin leaf 3envelopes

Puree Jelly Topping
Mango Puree 100gm
Gelatin Leaf 1.5envelopes

Mango 1 thick piece
Dark chocolat button 60gm

Make the mango mousse
Whisk egg white until foamy. Then, add in granulated sugar gradually and whisk until soft peak form.
Whisk whipping cream and gradually add in mango syrup until soft peak form.
Pour mango puree into the whipping cream and fold well with a rubber spatula.
Fold meringue into mango mixture and gently fold well.
Pour in metled gelatin into the mango mixture and gently fold.
Lay the cake based onto the baking tray.
Pour the mango mousse into the baking tray, place the top layer sponge and refrigerate for 1 1/2 hours.

Melt gelatin into the hot mango puree. Cool it down until 50C to puree jelly. Pour it over the top.
Evenly scatter the mango balls on the top and refrigerate for half an hour. Lastly, decorate the cake with chocolate ornaments.

This is not a difficult dessert to make, I am sure with my guide you will able to charm your guests, they will be in for a little delite!

Big Boys Oven

Monday, January 28, 2008

Lemon Meringue Tarlets

Lemon Meringue Tarlets

For the Crust:

¾ cup (180 mL) cold butter; cut into ½-inch (1.2 cm) pieces
2 cups (475 mL) all-purpose flour
¼ cup (60 mL) granulated sugar
¼ tsp (1.2 mL) salt
⅓ cup (80 mL) ice water

For the Filling:

2 cups (475 mL) water
1 cup (240 mL) granulated sugar
½ cup (120 mL) cornstarch
5 egg yolks, beaten
¼ cup (60 mL) butter
¾ cup (180 mL) fresh lemon juice
1 tbsp (15 mL) lemon zest
1 tsp (5 mL) vanilla extract

For the Meringue:

5 egg whites, room temperature
½ tsp (2.5 mL) cream of tartar
¼ tsp (1.2 mL) salt
½ tsp (2.5 mL) vanilla extract
¾ cup (180 mL) granulated sugar

For the Crust: Make sure all ingredients are as cold as possible. Using a food processor or pastry cutter and a large bowl, combine the butter, flour, sugar and salt. Process or cut in until the mixture resembles coarse meal and begins to clump together. Sprinkle with water, let rest 30 seconds and then either process very briefly or cut in with about 15 strokes of the pastry cutter, just until the dough begins to stick together and come away from the sides of the bowl. Turn onto a lightly floured work surface and press together to form a disk. Wrap in plastic and chill for at least 20 minutes.

To roll out tartlet dough, slice the dough into 6 pieces. On lightly floured surface, roll each circle of dough into a 5 inch disk. Stack the disks, separated by pieces of plastic wrap, on a plate, and refrigerate for 30 minutes.To bake the dough, position rack in oven to the centre of oven and preheat to 350ºF (180ºC). Place the disks of dough, evenly spaced, on a baking sheet and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown. Cool completely.

To finish tartlets, first place oven rack in the upper third of the oven and increase heat to 425ºF.

Divide the lemon filling equally among the disks, mounding it in the centre and leaving a 1-inch border all the way around.
Spoon the meringue decoratively over each tartlet, right to the edges, in dramatic swirling peaks. Return tartlets to oven and bake for about 5 minutes, until the meringue is golden brown.

Preheat oven to 350ºF (180ºC). Line the crust with foil and fill with metal pie weights or dried beans. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Carefully remove the foil and continue baking for 10 to 15 minutes, until golden. Cool completely before filling.

For the Filling: Bring the water to a boil in a large, heavy saucepan. Remove from the heat and let rest 5 minutes. Whisk the sugar and cornstarch together. Add the mixture gradually to the hot water, whisking until completely incorporated.

Return to the heat and cook over medium heat, whisking constantly until the mixture comes to a boil. The mixture will be very thick. Add about 1 cup (240 mL) of the hot mixture to the beaten egg yolks, whisking until smooth. Whisking vigorously, add the warmed yolks to the pot and continue cooking, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Remove from the heat and stir in butter until incorporated. Add the lemon juice, zest and vanilla, stirring until combined. Pour into the prepared crust. Cover with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming on the surface, and cool to room temperature.

For the Meringue: Preheat the oven to 375ºF (190ºC). Using an electric mixer beat the egg whites with the cream of tartar, salt and vanilla extract until soft peaks form. Add the sugar gradually, beating until it forms stiff, glossy peaks. Pile onto the cooled pie, bringing the meringue all the way over to the edge of the crust to seal it completely. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden. Cool on a rack. Serve within 6 hours to avoid a soggy crust.

I am now very hungry waiting for my next challenge, as fears had been overcome!

Big Boys Oven

Thursday, January 24, 2008

The Making of Macarons

Whisking the eggs . . . . .

Egg testing . . . . ?

Adding dry ingredients . . . !

Pipe it out babe!!!

Dressing them up!

Time to cook them . . . .

A coffee break with Illy and chit chat . . . .

Indulge some CHEESE TARTS


Break is over, JENNIFER'S turn .....

YOKESZE'S turn now ......

Ahha SANDY'S turn ........

Filling time!!!

The MACARONS of the day, what a wonderful day!!!






MANDARIN TARTS to end the class of the day!

It was an enjoyable afternoon and very fruitful especially for myself and also meeting my new students.

Big Boys Oven

Monday, January 21, 2008

A Lite Cheesecake


160gm Cream cheese
25gm Soften unsalted butter
120gm Milk
4 Egg Yolk

40gm Cakeflour
30gm Cornflour

4 Egg white
1/8 tsp Cream of Tartar
100gm Sugar
a pinch of salt

Preheat oven 180C
Sift ingredient B.
Whisk ingredient A, add egg yolk one by one. Add in ingredient B portionly.
Whisk egg white, add in sugar portionly, cream of tartar and salt. Whisk until firm.
Add C in to A, and gradually mix.
Place the mix in the baking tin. Sit the baking tin on a pool of water. Baked in the oven for 20-30mins.
When the cake surface turn golden in colour, it is ready, remove from the oven.
Optional - Brush kumquat syrup on the cake surface and place half cut kumquat compote as deco.

It is easy, whatever it takes you must try this recipe and you will never regret.

Big Boys Oven

Thursday, January 3, 2008

Kumquat Compote

Kumquat Compote (adapted from Hidemi Sugino's The Dessert Book) Makes about 24 halves kumquats

200g (7oz, about 12) kumquats
200g (1 cup) granulated sugar
200g (generous 3/4 cup) water

1. Wash and pat dry kumquats. Remove calyces, and cut in half horizontally; pit with a fork.
2. Bring sugar and water to a boil, and add kumquats. Cover with paper towel, and cook over medium heat for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside at room temperature overnight.
3. Reheat only poaching liquid to a boil an return over to kumquats. leaving overnight. refrigerated in a container up to 1 week.

I love these kumquat compote as they can be added into your baking, ice cream and many other dessert. In coming posts I will show you what I did with this gorgeous and lovely kumquat compote.

Big Boys Oven